Experimental investigation of the influence of carbonated water on sandstone and carbonate rock properties
Journal Article

Laboratory measurements using nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and gas

porosity and permeability analysis were conducted to acquire a petrophysical interpretation of the

Carbon Tan Sandstone and Savonnieres Carbonate for potential carbon dioxide storage in subsurface

formations. The relationships between pore structures, such as pore-size distribution, pore geometry,

and porosity/permeability, were investigated near and far from the wellbore. At operating pressures of

2500psi (17.24 MPa) and temperatures of 176 F (50 C), carbonated water was injected into a composite

core constructed of two similar core samples bounded by a compact disc located between them. The

current results showed that a strong calcite dissolution took place near the injection position of both rock

samples and led to improvements in the primary intergranular permeability and porosity, while the

carbonate sample showed significant improvement compared to sandstone. The durable heterogeneous

dissolution of calcite grains also led to the creation of new pores as intra-granular micro-pores. While at

deeper depths from the injection position, it noticed an insignificant development in pore structure and

its populations as well as rock hydraulic properties of both rock samples. In conclusion, the study

revealed that the injected carbonated brine had a valuable impact on fluid-formation interactive, which

improved rock's inlet properties compared with outlet.

Mohamed Khalifa Masoud Khalifa, (10-2022), Petroleum Research: Elsevier, 1 (1), 1-1

Predicting sequence stratigraphic architecture and its implication for hydrocarbon reservoir potential of the uppermost Silurian through Lower Devonian Winduck Interval, central Darling Basin of western New South Wales, SE Australia
Journal Article

This paper provides the results of lithostratigraphy and depositional environment of the uppermost Silurian

through Lower Devonian Winduck Interval section from three areas widely distributed in the central Bancannia

Trough from Bancannia South 1 well, the southern Pondie Range Sub-basin from Pondie Range 1 well and the

northwestern part of the Blantyre Sub-basin from two wells, the Booligal Creek 1 and 2. These wells were studied

using wireline log, core and cutting data to predict sequence stratigraphic architecture and its implication for

hydrocarbon sandstone reservoir potential. This study necessitated the use of detailed facies prediction relationships

and geometry of lithostratigraphic concepts for the purpose of establishing a sequence stratigraphic

architecture framework of the studied areas. Two units were established, lower and upper Winduck Interval,

within the Winduck Interval identified by lithological data examination and wireline log characteristics of the

sediments from the four wells in the study area. Results of the lithology type analysis showed that the Winduck

Interval is interbedded richly in sandstone and siltstone complex deposits. This paper presents a clear picture of

the sequence stratigraphic model, as well as that of the three third-order depositional sequences (DS1, DS2 and

DS3, respectively) that are identified from changes in systems tracts patterns (composed of lowstand, transgressive

and highstand), vertical and lateral facies sequence thickness changes and the lithostratigraphic units

distribution in the Winduck Interval section. Potential reservoir prospectivity targets are identified in lowstand

system tracts and highstand system tracts deposits consisting of sandstone facies and thin silts, while the

transgressive system tracts deposits consist of shales and some interbedded shaly siltstones, many having

excellent potential source and seal properties. The contribution of sequence stratigraphy as an approach to

understanding lithostratigraphy of the Winduck Interval has important significance in regard to future hydrocarbon

reservoirs exploration across the central Darling Basin.

Mohamed Khalifa Masoud Khalifa, (04-2022), Marine and Petroleum Geology: Elsevier, 26 (-1), -1--1

Correlation and sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the lithostratigraphic Snake Cave Interval: Implications for hydrocarbon reservoir prospectivity between the southeast Blantyre and northwestern Neckarboo Sub-basins, Darling Basin, southeastern Aus
Journal Article

Correlation and sequence stratigraphic interpretation was conducted on the upper Lower through upper Middle

Devonian sandstones of the Snake Cave Interval succession between the southeast Blantyre and northwestern

Neckarboo sub-basins across the central Darling Basin. This article necessitated the definition and use of many

sedimentary lithotypes related to different facies associations and depositional environment criteria for the

purpose of establishing the sequence stratigraphy to aid hydrocarbon exploration of the studied areas. The data

set used a combination of wireline logs, core/cutting data and analysis of the paleo-environments of sedimentary

facies from three wells. The sedimentological analysis showed that the Snake Cave Interval section presents three

different facies associations, which are visible in both vertical and lateral successions, and are characterised as:

meandering and braided fluvial facies associations with minor fluvio-shallow lacustrine complex facies associations.

The Snake Cave Interval section in the studied areas is consistently defined by six third-order depositional

sequences informally named SCS1, SCS2, SCS3, SCS4, SCS5 and SCS6 in the Nyngynderry-1 and Mount Emu-1

exploration wells, and the Kewell East-1 stratigraphic well. All the stratal patterns in the internal sequence

stratigraphic units are asymmetric and marked by lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts separated

by sequence boundaries, maximum flooding surfaces and transgression surfaces with unique gamma-ray log

response characteristics calibrated by particular lithologic aspects. These are all incorporated within the

sequence stratigraphic approach to hydrocarbon reservoir prediction. The stratigraphic architecture of the thirdorder

depositional sequences presented here in our study has implications for the hydrocarbon potential of

sandstone reservoirs in the southeastern Darling Basin including the Snake Cave Interval succession targets.

Mohamed Khalifa Masoud Khalifa, (06-2021), Marine and Petroleum Geology: Elsevier, 1 (1), 1-1

Lithostratigraphy of the upper Lower Devonian through the upper Middle Devonian succession of the southeast Darling Basin, western New South Wales, southeastern Australia: a case study of sedimentological features and significance of depositional facies
Journal Article

Detailed sedimentological analysis of depositional facies through lithostratigraphic correlation was conducted for the upper

Lower Devonian through the upper Middle Devonian Snake Cave Interval strata of the southeast Darling Basin. The methodology

used includes identifying changes in rock types from sedimentary lithotypes within different facies associations from well

data, wireline-log patterns and palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. This has helped to define a lithostratigraphic correlation for

the Snake Cave Interval section. This study has re-interpreted the upper and lower boundaries of the Snake Cave Interval using

marked changes in gamma-ray log features and core and cutting lithology logs to estimate the depth of these boundaries from

three wells. The Snake Cave Interval consists of ten lithotypes that define three facies associations (FAs) in the three available

wells. These were deposited within three main facies associations: meandering fluvial facies association A (MFFA-A), braided

fluvial facies association B (BFFA-B) and fluvio-shallow lacustrine complex facies association C (FSLCFA-C). The paper

includes a broad description of the significance of lithostratigraphic facies related to depositional environments of the upper

Lower Devonian through the upper middle Devonian succession section.

Mohamed Khalifa Masoud Khalifa, (03-2021), Arabian Journal of Geosciences: springer, 1 (1), 1-1

Correlation of the lithostratigraphic facies relationships and depositional environments of the uppermost Silurian through Lower Devonian strata across the central Darling Basin, western New South Wales, SE Australia
Conference paper

This paper is focused on the detailed lithostratigraphic facies characterisation of the paleo-environments

of the uppermost Silurian through Lower Devonian Winduck Interval strata from the

Bancannia South 1, Pondie Range 1 and Booligal Creek 1 and 2 wells, across the central Darling

Basin of western New South Wales. Based on data from both wireline logs and drill cores and cuttings,

an interpretation of paleo-environments and evolution of the depositional facies is presented.

Our approach involves two key interpretations. The first outcome was the delineation of

the Winduck Interval section (maximum observed thickness of approximately 1475m) and formal

subdivision into lower and upper Winduck Intervals, based on well data from the central

Bancannia Trough, southern Pondie Range Sub-basin and northwestern flank of the Blantyre Subbasin.

The second outcome is based on the internal lithostratigraphy of the Winduck Interval represented

by 11 sedimentary lithofacies organised into three lithofacies associations (LFAs). LFA-X1

is interpreted as distributary-channel sandstone complex deposits, LFA-X2 is interpreted as

distributary mouth bar with small-scale braided delta plain complex deposits and LFA-X3 is interpreted

as tidal channel sands with proximal delta front complex deposits. Subsurface lithostratigraphic

facies analysis relationships and depositional environments of the Winduck Interval section

have implications for evaluating the hydrocarbon potential and may assist future exploration

efforts in the central Darling Basin, especially the Bancannia Trough and Pondie Range Sub-basin.

Mohamed Khalifa Masoud Khalifa, (11-2020), Australian Journal of Earth Sciences: Taylor & Francis Group, 1-16